Tag Archives: Family

Pandemic Diary: 21 Feb 2021

The saga of scheduling a vaccination for James has begun. First the website crashed the day his age group (65+) opened up. Since then, he’s tried several times a day to get through all the prompts to the scheduling option only to find that, although there are lots of openings for the first shot, there aren’t any available for the second one. And they won’t let you schedule the first one without the second. He’s talked in person with our local pharmacist, and over the phone with another human being, but still no go.

There’s no waiting list, so he just has to keep calling over and over, hoping to hit the jackpot. We have no idea why second shots aren’t available yet, and why you can’t schedule the first one without the second. I’m guessing they want to keep people from getting one and thinking they don’t need the next. Without the booster, your immunity is only about 50% rather than 95%. So we won’t get this plague under control unless people get both shots.

But the lack of a waiting list is preposterous. The vaccine roll-out is definitely improving now that Biden’s in charge, but it’s still disorganized and nearly impossible to navigate. At this rate, I won’t get mine until June.

We’ve just begun a conversation with Jesse about a way to spend Easter together. She’s already fully vaccinated, and pray to God James will be by then, so we might be able to find a way to do it safely for Mike and I, because it’s not likely we’ll be vaccinated before April 4. I’d be happy to sit in a chilly park 6 feet away from them to be able to celebrate together. I’ll just bundle up.

Pandemic Diary: 16 Feb 2021

It’s been a while since I felt motivated to write here. Beginning a new year knowing it will be just like last year for several months or all 12, or even worse given the new strains that are appearing. It made me feel totally exhausted emotionally, so I had no energy to engage with it in writing. But it’s time to get back to reflection.

At least we have a mature adult back in the White House. That lifts a huge weight off my feeling life. It was a horrible trip there, but we made it. Now we wait for the next neo-Nazi attack. I’m sure there will be one.

Louie has come up with a game to play during our zoom get-togethers—he calls it “Chaos”. We set up a whiteboard that we can all draw on, then Louie draws a city and has me draw a house. For some reason I haven’t figured out yet, he draws a fried egg in the middle of the city. Then Gwad starts drawing lines and boxes all over the screen, playing the part of chaos, while Louie erases them as fast as he can. He’s been wanting me to be “on his team” lately—I guess maybe being the house and his teammate makes me a safe place amidst the chaos. And he feels totally safe with Gwad, so it’s a way for Louie to deal with the chaos of his world right now in a safe place. We have a great time playing, lots of laughs, destroying the chaos with fun.

His most telling quotes from yesterday’s game:

  • “Chaos levels are high today.”
  • “Fighting chaos has never been easier in my life!”

I’m glad we can make this all a little easier for him. I can’t imagine what his sensitive 7-year-old soul is going to take away from this pandemic time.

An early Chaos adventure.

Pandemic Diary: 30 Dec 2020

Second-to-last day of 2020. We’re having a Zoom gathering to remember Mick this afternoon. I read a great article (transcript of a podcast, actually) about how to mourn the loss of a loved one in this time of isolation. Like all disruptions, this gives us the opportunity to break out of old habits that maybe aren’t serving us as well as in the past, and find new ways to do things. One of the benefits of Zoom living is that it allows people from all over the world to participate in something, not just the people who can travel there at that time. It’s definitely not as satisfying in terms of sharing physical affection—it will be heartbreaking not to be able to hold my sister and niece in my arms. But at least I can attend. If I had to drive 5 hours to get there, it would’ve been much more difficult to participate.

Zoom living is the new normal. We have to be creative in how to do it well.

Mick and Michael Anna Fambro

Pandemic Diary: 16 Dec 2020

I haven’t been able to write here for a little while because the tragedy of COVID-19 cases and deaths has just been too overwhelming to talk about. Almost 210,000 cases per day in the U.S., and over 2,500 deaths yesterday alone. The daily death numbers have gone over 3,000 recently. I can’t even get my head around numbers like that. Like I said, too overwhelming.

To stay sane and not horribly depressed and anxious, I focus on the fact that no one in our immediate family has gotten it, and in our extended families there have only been a few cases and none life-threatening.

I found this video today on Facebook. It comes from a family of white privilege, but so do I, so it really speaks to me. I love these guys—they say true things in fun and creative ways. Some of their parodies are priceless! The Holderness family. I recommend them.

Pandemic Diary: 3 Dec 2020

Infections continue to rage here, as do deaths. Even Pittsfield has reinstated stricter lockdown measures. It’s mostly hitting nursing homes again. But I’m staying home with my asthmatic, easily upsettable bronchii.

We just heard today that a loved one’s got it now. Hopefully it will be a mild case, although she’s feeling pretty miserable at the moment.

Any good news? It’s sunny out today. 😎